KERRIE FITNESS – Visits St Andrews Cathedral, Sydney.

Well, what a spring it’s been so far.  Wettest in ten years and looks like that record is going to ba a hard one to beat.  A bonus with all the rain and then sun is the flowers have come out and the grass is finally green.  The historic site of St Andrews Cathedral was coloured by nature so we took some pictures for all to see.

Looking for a place to work out, where everyone knows your name?  Then come to Kerrie Fitness and train with Kerrie.

Can’t make it to the Studio?  Then download your digital class today at www.kerriefitness.com.au

KERRIE FITNESS – Shares – All the #fitspo in the world hasn’t made us more active

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10-Sep-2018

The human race is plodding along at a leisurely pace towards rising rates of heart disease, type 2 diabetes, and obesity, the latest report from the World Health Organisation shows.

Despite rolling government campaigns – and the rise of #fitspo – there has been no improvement in the global rates of physical activity for 15 years, found the first study to estimate global physical activity trends.

More than one quarter of the world’s adult population (1.4 billion people) were not active enough in 2016, according to the report published in The Lancet Global Health on Wednesday.

Australian ranked 97 out of 168 countries included in the analysis. Just over 30 per cent of the Australian adult population weren’t active enough, with Australian women more likely to be inactive than men (33.6 per cent versus 27 per cent).

Overall, one in three women (32 per cent) and one in four men (23 per cent) globally do not get enough exercise, highlighting a need to offer safe, affordable and culturally acceptable interventions to physical activity among women globally.

WHO’s recommended levels of physical activity are at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity or 75 minutes of vigorous-intensity physical activity per week to lessen the risk of non-communicable diseases including cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes as well as some cancers.

High-income countries have levels of inactivity that are more than twice as high as low-income countries (37 per cent versus 16 per cent).

Inactivity rates rose 5 per cent in the wealthier countries over the 15-year period, found the analysis of 358 population-based surveys that canvassed self-reported activity levels including incidental exercise at work, home, travel and leisure time.

Four countries reported more than half their adult population were not doing enough physical activity: Kuwait (67 per cent), American Samoa (53 per cent), Saudi Arabia and Iraq.

About 40 per cent of adults in the US were not doing enough exercise. The same was true of 36 per cent of adults in Britain and 14 per cent in China.

New Zealand and the US were among the countries with the highest increases in inactivity over the 15-year period.

The countries with the lowest levels of insufficient physical activity in 2016 were Uganda and Mozambique (6 per cent).

Some countries did improve significantly. Inactivity levels dropped from 26 to 17 per cent in east and south-east Asia, largely influenced by China’s recent enthusiasm for exercise, the authors said.

“Unlike other major global health risks, levels of insufficient physical activity are not falling worldwide, on average, and over a quarter of all adults are not reaching the recommended levels of physical activity for good health,” warns the study’s lead author, Dr Regina Guthold of the WHO.

Office jobs, sedentary and tech-heavy leisure activities and motorised transport were likely driving the higher levels of inactivity in wealthier countries, while lower-income countries were more active by virtue of physical labour and fewer motor transport options, the authors said.

Dr Guthold said countries needed to better implement policies designed to increase physical activity.

Heart Foundation spokesperson on physical activity, Adjunct Professor Trevor Shilton, said the Australian findings were disheartening.

“This study shows that the message about the importance of physical activity still isn’t getting through to many Australians, and there is much room for improvement,” Professor Shilton said.

“It is vitally important that we take notice of this research, because physical inactivity is a risk factor for heart disease, which continues to be the leading killer of Australians,” he said.

In August, the Australian government launched its “Move It Aus” campaign, aimed at coaxing Australians away from their screens to “Find Your 30”: 30 minutes of heart-rate-raising exercise.

The Australian Sports Commission described Move it Aus as “Life be in it 2.0”, referring a similar campaign launched in the 1970s.

This article was originally published in The Sydney Morning Herald by Kate Aubusson

Looking to change your own #fitspo?

Come train with me live at KERRIE FITNESS or download your digital class at www.kerriefitness.com.au.

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KERRIE FITNESS – Shares – Vigorous exercise determines successful ageing

17-Aug-2018

The data showed that older adults who participated in more than 5000 METs of exercise each week saw the greatest resection in chronic disease.

The researchers compiled data from The Blue Mountains Eye Study (BMES) — a population-based study of common eye conditions and a range of other health outcomes in a suburban population, which started in 1992. The analyses involved 1584 adults over 49 years old, living west of Sydney. The sample participants did not have cancer, coronary artery disease and stroke at baseline and were followed over 10 years.

Information was collected from the participants on their performance of moderate or vigorous activities and walking exercise. This was used to determine total metabolic equivalents (METs) minutes of activity per week. Successful ageing status was determined through a questionnaire and was categorised as the absence of depressive symptoms, disability, cognitive impairment, respiratory symptoms and systemic conditions like cancer and coronary artery disease.

The data showed that older adults who participated in more than 5000 METs of exercise each week saw the greatest resection in chronic disease. The current World Health Organization guidelines recommend at least 600 MET minutes of physical activity each week. That is equivalent to 150 minutes of brisk walking or 75 minutes of running.

The researchers found that participants who engaged in the highest level of total physical activity were twice as likely to avoid developing chronic conditions like cancer, diabetes, heart disease, angina and stroke. They were also more likely to have optimal mental and physical health 10 years later.

While some adults may not be able to engage in high levels of activity, the researchers encourage inactive adults to do some sort of exercise and those engaging in moderate exercise to increase their levels of physical activity where possible to ensure successful ageing.

Originally published in Scientific Reports   

Looking for somewhere to age sexy!!!

Come train with us at KERRIE FITNESS, can’t make it to the studio then download your own class at www.kerriefitness.com.au

 

KERRIE FITNESS – Irrespective of the weather!

Watsons Bay, Sydney. Looking out the window it was cold, raining, overcast and windy… I know, let’s go check out Watsons Bay!

And we did. Even managed to take some photo’s and had a great time exploring the area.

Just remember, you never know what life will throw at you next, so be sure to savour and enjoy what you are doing right now. Especially with the ones who are dear to you.

Looking for a group fitness studio? Train with me at my studio KERRRIE FITNESS, and while you are away you can still train with me… go to www.kerriefitness.com.au and download your digital copy today!

KERRIE FITNESS – Time to wander through Surry Hills, Sydney

With a beautiful spring day in full swing, what better way to spend it than wandering through historical Old Surry Hills in Sydney.  Checking into some of the beautiful old pubs, The Keg and Brew, The Dove and Olive, The Strawberry Hills Hotel, The Madison Hotel and The Royal Exchange.  Full of history, good food, good wine and good people.  Get out and about, enjoy life, meet some people, make a new friend.  Funniest quote of the day was from a publican to Kerrie…”Oh look at you standing there like a Princess”.  Never seen Kerrie blush so much!

So why don’t you wander in to KERRIE FITNESS and train with Kerrie in person?

Download your digital class today at www.kerriefitness.com.au

KERRIE FITNESS – Blue Suede… Boots!

On a sunny Friday afternoon what better way to enjoy good company than to sit down and relax at Darling Harbour. Take in the views, good food, good wine and good conversation.  Take the time to check in with your significant other, wine makes it easier to ask the hard questions which sometimes need to be asked.  If you don’t communicate, how do you know you’re even on the right page? We do this regularly and find that it not only keeps our business on track but also our relationship.  Even after 23 years together, we take the time to make sure our marriage is all it can be.

So after some couple time in the city, how about some “YOU” time at KERRIE FITNESS, to check in and fine tune yourself physically?

Can’t make it to the studio?

Then head to www.kerriefitness.com.au and download your digital class today!

KERRIE FITNESS – How to naturally produce more anti-anxiety and antidepressant hormones

03-October-2018

Do you often find yourself feeling like you got up on the wrong side of the bed?

Fluctuating moods can completely change our experience of life, affecting not just how we feel about each and every day but also our relationships with those around us.

The way we feel on a day-to-day basis can depend on many things. Some of it might be related to things that are happening in our world. It’s normal and natural to feel a full range of emotions and to respond with sadness or anger to certain situations. But sometimes, we can feel flat, moody or down for no apparent reason – but this we can change!

More often than not, we can have a positive impact on our mood by addressing the balance of hormones associated with our happiness. Let’s take a look at some of the more common happy hormones and what can impact on us maintaining optimum levels of them to begin with.

Serotonin

One of the better known happy hormones, serotonin, functions as a neurotransmitter in the brain and helps us to feel happy, calm and content. What you may not know about this lovely hormone is that around 80% of it is made in our gut. There really is something to the phrase “gut feeling” – it’s hard to feel great when you are suffering with digestive challenges! Another common scenario involves a see-saw between serotonin and melatonin. Melatonin is our sleep hormone; it is responsible for sending and keeping us asleep. They work antagonistically, so when one goes up the other goes down. For some people though, they end up round the wrong way. If this happens, you might find yourself feeling down and sleepy most of the day.

Endorphins

Endorphins are also well-known for their mood-lifting effects. They help to reduce pain as well as helping us to feel uplifted. Many people know of the link between endorphins and exercise, and indeed, they are stimulated by physical activity.

Progesterone

When we think about progesterone, we might only think about the role it plays in our fertility. But this powerful hormone has other biological functions in the body. Progesterone is a powerful anti-anxiety agent, an anti-depressant, and a diuretic, which means it helps us to eliminate excess fluid. Progesterone is supposed to be the dominant hormone in the second half of the menstrual cycle, known as the luteal phase, and during our childbearing years it is predominantly made in the ovaries. However, we also make some progesterone from our adrenal glands, and this becomes our main site of production after menopause. Because our adrenals also make our stress hormones, chronic stress – which is extremely common these days – can compromise our adrenal progesterone production. Stress can also contribute to irregular ovulation or anovulatory cycles, and ovulation is required to stimulate the increase in progesterone in the second half of the menstrual cycle.

So now that we know a little bit about some of the hormones responsible for our mood, what can we do to boost them?

Bring awareness to your breath

We can influence our stress hormone production via our breath. When we breathe diaphragmatically (long, slow breaths that move the belly in out and out), this communicates calm to our body, which supports sex hormone balance as well as digestion.

Ensure excellent digestion

Digestion is the cornerstone of our health as it is through digestion that we absorb all the nutrients from our food, many of which act as building blocks for our hormones. There are numerous ways we can improve our digestion such as chewing our food well, eating mostly whole, real foods (limiting or avoiding anything processed/artificial) and eating in a calm, relaxed state.

Support liver function

When it comes to how we look and feel on a daily basis, the liver packs a mighty punch. It is the key organ responsible for eliminating problematic substances, including ‘old’ hormones that we no longer need. Reduce your intake of ‘liver loaders’ (trans fats, refined sugars, synthetic substances, alcohol and caffeine) and increase your intake of plant foods – particularly leafy green vegetables of the Brassica family, which the liver especially loves!

Movement

The mood-lifting effects of exercise are well established, but many people still believe that they have to slog it out at the gym or run long distances to get the benefits. Move your body in a way that you enjoy! Also remember that incidental movement is highly beneficial so look for more ways to incorporate movement in your day.

This article was originally published by Dr Libby for Body and Soul.

So to improve your mood come and train at KERRIE FITNESS,  if you can’t make it “LIVE” don’t worry #kezfit is available online and you can workout at any time!
Go to www.kerrifitness.com.au and download your exercise program now.

KERRIE FITNESS – Is there an optimal time of day to work out?

17-Sep-2018

We all know we should exercise regularly, but it can be difficult to fit exercise into our busy schedules. Most people can only exercise before or after work, so it’s worth examining whether the time of day we exercise affects outcomes such as weight loss and sleep.

To understand why the timing of exercise might be important, we first need to understand how our bodies function over a 24-hour day. Our biological clock helps to regulate sleep patterns, when we eat, blood pressure and body temperature. These “circadian rhythms” have been associated with many aspects of physical performance, health and well-being.

The early bird gets the worm, right?

In terms of performing a consistent exercise habit, it’s tempting to think morning exercise is more sustainable as it’s “out of the way” before other time pressures may interfere. But there isn’t much evidence to support this theory. Instead, it may just come down to what your preferred time to train is.

A study investigating the relationship between circadian preference and sport found athletes tend to select sports with training times that suit their individual preference. So “morning people” were more likely to select sports such as cycling, which has regular morning training. 

If you’re thinking about breaking up your work day to squeeze in a workout at lunch time, be wary. Researchers compared attendance to lunch time group classes with after-work classes. Those who were assigned to the training during work only attended 26 per cent of sessions, compared to the after-work group who attended 70 per cent of the sessions.

Exercising before brekkie

Exercising on an empty stomach is different, physiologically, from exercising after a meal. After an overnight fast, our bodies are reliant on fat as its primary fuel source, so if you exercise in the morning, before eating breakfast, you will essentially burn more fat.

Burning more fat during exercise may have a metabolic advantage, but does that make a difference to fat loss over a period of time? Unfortunately, it’s unlikely. Research examined the difference between exercising in a fasted state, compared with after food, for four weeks. While both groups lost fat mass, there was no difference in the amount of fat lost between fasted and fed exercise.

Researchers investigating the impact of six weeks of morning versus evening exercise on energy intake and weight loss found those who exercised in the morning ate less throughout the day, and subsequently, lost 1kg more than those in the evening group. 

But some researchers have also found we work harder in the evening. Conceivably, if we are working harder in the evening, over time, we will expend more energy, potentially leading to greater weight loss than with morning exercise.

Exercise and sleep

Exercise increases how awake we feel and raises our core temperature, which, in theory, is contrary to the “optimal” conditions to elicit feelings of sleepiness.

Despite previous recommendations that discouraged exercising within four hours of bedtime, there’s a growing body of evidence to support evening exercise.

Swiss researchers found vigorous exercise performed one-and-a-half hours before bedtime was associated with falling asleep faster, fewer awakenings after sleep onset, and better mood states.

In contrast, to get up early for morning training, some researchers found swimmers are sacrificing sleep, compared to rest days. So, if you’re going to get up at 5am to exercise, make sure you get to bed a little earlier the night before, so you don’t lose sleep to make it work.

So is there really a better time of day to exercise?

Sticking to a workout plan isn’t easy when we have competing demands like work and family commitments, which can vary week to week. There are advantages to both morning and evening exercise. To get the most health benefits from exercise, the best time of day to exercise is when you will actually do it.

What we do know is you are more likely to do it regularly if you select a time and stick to it, regardless of whether it’s morning or evening. Exercising consistently at the same time each day is one of the best predictors of developing a long-lasting exercise habit.

Paige Brooker is a PhD candidate at the University of Queensland; Michael Leveritt, is a senior lecturer in nutrition and dietetics at the University of Queensland; Neil King, is a director of research training and IHBI Theme Leader at Queensland University of Technology, and Sjaan Gomersall is a lecturer at The University of Queensland.

Further to this, #kezfit is available online and you can workout at any time!

Go to www.kerrifitness.com.au and download your exercise program now.

Blueberry & Banana Bread – KERRIE FITNESS

I have always been a lover of banana bread but try to avoid buying it in cafes as it is filled with oil, butter and sugar. This little beauty is super healthy, but doesn’t taste it. Hallelujah! The whole family, including Grandparents love it! I make it weekly and no slice ever ends up in the freezer!!!*

Ingredients:

3 eggs (alternatively 1 cup of apple sauce)

3 ripe bananas, mashed

1 cup almond meal

1/4 cup coconut flour

1/4 cup raw honey

1 cup fresh blueberries (or raspberries)

1 tsp baking powder

Pinch Of Cinnamon

Instructions:

• Pre-heat oven to 180 degrees celsius, fan forced

• Line a small loaf tin with baking paper

• Using a medium size mixing bowl, lightly beat the eggs with a fork

• On a plate or chopping board use a fork to mash the bananas

• Minus the blueberries, mix all of the ingredients with a wooden spoon in the mixing bowl with the eggs

• Gently fold in the blueberries

• Pour into pre-lined tin

• Bake in oven for approximately 60 minutes, or until brown. (Just depending on the heat of your oven) Insert a skewer into the centre of the loaf, if it comes out clean, it is ready.

• Remove from oven and leave in tin for 10 minutes

• Remove from tin and cool on wire rack

• Cut yourself a sneaky piece to enjoy hot off the press whilst the remainder of the loaf cools!!

Bon appetite!

*NB: I like to slice the loaf, let cool and then individually wrap in cling wrap. That way they’re easy for the whole family to grab and go. Whatever pieces are not going to be consumed within 24 hours, pop in the fridge. If you’re only making for 1-2 people, pop some slices in the freezer. You can then either let defrost to room temperature or defrost in the microwave by removing the cling wrap and wrapping in paper towel ❤️ 👩🏼‍🍳

KERRIE FITNESS – Summers day in Winter.

Waking up to a very summers like day in the middle of winter calls for one thing… Dash to the city and enjoy life.

The easiest way to enjoy life is being in control of your health.

So come and visit Kerrie at her studio KERRIE FITNESS, for all the exercise, motivation and direction you need to achieve your personal fitness goals.

If the studio is too far away, or you can’t make a class, check out Kerrie’s online classes at kerriefitness.com.au.